Debt Management

Protect Your Credit by Checking and Correcting These Reports

Josh Bitel Contributed by: Josh Bitel

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t think or worry about your credit score unless you’re getting ready to use it. Your credit report provides detailed information about your credit history and may even make or break your applications for loans, mortgages, or credit cards. Errors or false applications bogging down your score could also prevent you from receiving a better interest rate, for example.

protect your credit by checking and correcting these reports

Tips for checking your credit report

  1. Visit annualcreditreport.com to request your free credit report from your choice of three agencies: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. Use all three. You are entitled to a free report from each every 12 months.

  2. Set an annual reminder to pull your report with each agency. Stagger these reminders, so you can check your full report once every four months and keep a closer eye on it.

  3. Review all information, including the basics – addresses, phone numbers, employers, etc. – to spot any errors or discrepancies.

  4. Make sure you recognize all accounts, loans, credit cards, etc. listed on your report.

Fixing or disputing errors

When you notice a problem, first directly contact the credit reporting companies and let them know what information you believe is not correct. You may be asked to provide supporting documentation to dispute a claim as fraud. In some instances, that may be hard, if not impossible, to do. It can be difficult to produce proof that you never opened a credit card, for example. Still, putting forth your best effort is well worth your time.

Second, contact the fraud/security department at the company that reported the fraudulent information. They will send dispute paperwork for you to submit with supporting documentation. Inform them, in writing, that the account was opened or charged without your knowledge, explain why you dispute the information and are asking that it be removed or corrected. Keep a paper trail for yourself.

Also, verify whether the debt has been sold to a collections agency. If it has, make sure they will notify the collections agency that the debt is in dispute. And brace yourself! It could take 90 days (or more!) before you see a resolution. Set a reminder to follow up if you have not heard anything within the time promised. Once you have received confirmation that the fraudulent claim has been discharged, make sure they have also closed the account in your name.

Haggling with credit reporting agencies can be a pain, but the work is a necessary evil. Misreported information could lead to your credit score suffering by as much as 100 points, and unless you review and monitor your reports on a consistent basis, you’ll never know.

Josh Bitel is a Client Service Associate at Center for Financial Planning, Inc.®


Repurposed from July 23, 2015 - Previous blog

Why Retirees Should Consider Renting

Nick Defenthaler Contributed by: Nick Defenthaler, CFP®

“Why would you ever rent? It’s a waste of money! You don’t build equity by renting. Home ownership is just what successful people do.”

Sound familiar? I’ve heard various versions of these statements over the years, and every time I do, the frustration makes my face turns red. I guess I don’t have a very good poker face!

why retirees should consider renting

As a country, we have conditioned ourselves to believe that homeownership is always the best route and that renting is only for young folks. If you ask me, this philosophy is just flat out wrong and shortsighted.

Below, I’ve outlined various reasons that retirees who have recently sold or are planning to sell might consider renting:

Higher Mortgage Rates

  • The current rate on a 30-year mortgage is hovering around 4.6%. The days of “cheap money” and rates below 4% have simply come and gone.

Interest Deductibility

  • Roughly 92% of Americans now take the standard deduction ($12,200 for single filers, $24,400 for married filers). It’s likely that you’ll deduct little, if any, mortgage interest on your return.

Maintenance Costs

  • Very few of us move into a new home without making changes. Home improvements aren’t cheap and should be taken into consideration when deciding whether it makes more sense to rent or buy.

Housing Market “Timing”

  • Home prices have increased quite a bit over the past decade. Many experts suggest homes are fully valued, so don’t bank on your new residence to provide stock-market-like returns any time soon.

Tax-Free Equity

  • In most cases, you won’t see tax consequences when you sell your home. The tax-free proceeds from the sale could be a good way to help fund your spending goal in retirement.  

Flexibility

  • You simply can’t put a price tag on some things. Maintaining flexibility with your housing situation is certainly one of them. For many of us, the flexibility of renting is a tremendous value-add when compared to home ownership.

Quick Decisions

  • Rushing into a home purchase in a new area can be a costly mistake. If you think renting is a “waste of money” because you aren’t building equity, just look at moving costs, closing costs (even if you won’t have a mortgage), and the level of interest you pay early in a mortgage. Prior to buying, consider renting for at least two years in the new area to make darn sure it’s somewhere you want to stay.

Every situation is different, but if you’re near or in retirement and thinking about selling your home, I encourage you to consider all housing options. Reach out to your advisor as you think through this large financial decision, to ensure you’re making the best choice for your personal and family goals.

Nick Defenthaler, CFP® is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ at Center for Financial Planning, Inc.® Nick works closely with Center clients and is also the Director of The Center’s Financial Planning Department. He is also a frequent contributor to the firm’s blogs and educational webinars.


Any opinions are those of Nick Defenthaler, CFP® and not necessarily those of RJFS or Raymond James. The information contained in this report does not purport to be a complete description of the securities, markets, or developments referred to in this material. Investing involves risk and you may incur a profit or loss regardless of strategy selected.